Blog Archives

Quote of the day: 2/26/13

“So avoid using the word ‘very’ because it’s lazy. A man is not very tired, he is exhausted. Don’t use very sad, use morose. Language was invented for one reason, boys – to woo women – and, in that endeavor, laziness will not do. It also won’t do in your essays”.

-N.H. Kleinbaum, Dead Poets Society

Advertisements

quote of the day: 2/13/13

“People fall so in love with their pain, they can’t leave it behind. The same as the stories they tell. We trap ourselves”.

-From Haunted by Chuck Palahniuk

Quote of the day: 2/7/13

127. They that love beyond the World, cannot be separated by it.

128. Death cannot kill, what never dies.

129. Nor can Spirits ever be divided that love and live in the same Divine Principle; the Root and Record of their Friendship.

130. If Absence be not Death, neither is theirs.

131. Death is but Crossing the World, as Friends do the Seas; They live in one another still.

132. For they must needs be present, that love and live in that which is Omnipresent.

133. In this Divine Glass, they see Face to Face; and their Converse is Free, as well as Pure.

134. This is the Comfort of Friends, that though they may be said to Die, yet their Friendship and Society are, in the best Sense, ever present, because Immortal.

-From More Fruits of Solitude by William Penn

williampenn

Quote of the day: 2/6/13

“Be soft. Do not let the world make you hard. Do not let pain make you hate. Do not let the bitterness steal your sweetness. Take pride that even though the rest of the world may disagree, you still believe it to be a beautiful place”.

-Kurt Vonnegut

 

Quote of the day (lyric edition): 2/5/13

“Baby I have been here before
I know this room, I’ve walked this floor
I used to live alone before I knew you.
I’ve seen your flag on the marble arch
Love is not a victory march
It’s a cold and it’s a broken Hallelujah”

From “Hallelujah” by Leonard Cohen

“Pain is an essential part of the grooming process, and that is not accidental. Plucking the eyebrows, shaving under the arms, wearing a girdle, learning to walk in high-heeled shoes, having one’s nose fixed, straightening or curling one’s hair —these things hurt. The pain, of course, teaches an important lesson: no price is too great, no process too repulsive, no operation too painful for the woman who would be beautiful. The tolerance of pain and the romanticize of that tolerance begins here, in preadolescence, in socialization, and serves to prepare women for lives of childbearing, self-abnegation, and husband-pleasing. The adolescent experience of the “pain of being a woman” casts the feminine psyche into a masochistic mold and forces the adolescent to conform to a self-image which bases itself on mutilation of the body, pain happily suffered, and restricted physical mobility. It creates the masochistic personalities generally found in adult women: subservient, materialistic (since all value is placed on the body and its ornamentation), intellectually restricted, creatively impoverished. It forces women to be a sex of lesser accomplishment, weaker, as underdeveloped as any backward nation. Indeed, the effects of that prescribed relationship between women and their bodies are so extreme, so deep, so extensive, that scarcely any area of human possibility is left untouched by it.”

Andrea Dworkin, Woman Hating

Quote of the day: 2/4/13

“A man gains a drop of blood per day from eating.
Each night, he gets up to slash himself
Across the face and wrist.
He must be bitten by ten thousand mosquitoes.
He sucks and he sucks.
Where would all that blood go otherwise?
Once a month, a woman drops a teacup on the floor,
A fine teacup with bones inside it.
Vietnamese and Germans now speak the same language.

-from Linh Dinh’s “Conversation Table” which is published in All Around What Empties Out

all-around-what-empties-out-linh-dinh-paperback-cover-art

Quote of the day: 1/29/13

“It’s a strange thing, but when you are dreading something, and would give anything to slow down time, it has a disobliging habit of speeding up”.

-From Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire

hungarian horntial

 

Quote of the day: 1/28/13

“We are not like that. We know that no one ever seizes power with the intention of relinquishing it. Power is not a means, it is an end. One does not establish a dictatorship in order to safeguard a revolution; one makes the revolution in order to establish the dictatorship. The object of persecution is persecution. The object of terrorism is terrorism. The object of oppression is oppression. The object of torture is torture. The object of murder is murder. The object of power is power. Now do you begin to understand me?”

-From 1984 by George Orwell

1984-movie-bb_a11

 

From the film adaptation of 1984

1984

Personal notes: Orwell’s 1984 is probably the single most influential novel that I read during high school. It completely reignited my love for literature and pushed me to read genres that I had not previously looked into. Cliche as is sounds,  it taught me lessons about questioning authority, thinking for myself, and inspired me to write in ways that I thought to be ‘vulgar’ or ‘manly’ previously. This is one of those pieces that I credit for changing me in ways that I never really thought that I could be changed. I’m certainly glad that I read it at the time of my life that I did.

quote of the day: 1/27/13

“People aren’t either wicked or noble. They’re like chef salads, with good things and bad things chopped and mixed together in a vinaigrette of confusion or conflict”.

-Lemony Snicket, The Grim Grotto

{2FCAF8B9-6338-43B1-89D3-F931AEDE7AEE}Img100

 

Personal notes: The Lemony Snicket books are always something that I can leaf through when I need a smile. I love how the entire series is completely grim and morose, yet peppered with so much humor and wit. Snicket has a rare way of shining light upon the little truths of life in a simplistic and almost childlike way. His writing has always been something that I’ve deemed as special because it’s quirky and completely its own.